Neighborhood Disadvantage, Poor Social Conditions, and Cardiovascular Disease Incidence among African American Adults in the Jackson Heart Study

In Building Demand for Healthy Places & Practices, Peer Research, Research

Neighborhood Disadvantage, Poor Social Conditions, and Cardiovascular Disease Incidence among African American Adults in the Jackson Heart Study

Sharrelle Barber, ScD, (NC 2016) examined the impact of neighborhood conditions resulting from racial residential segregation on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.  The researchers used data from the Jackson Heart Study (a study of CVD among African Americans in Jackson, MS to examine neighborhoods and CVD incidence) to develop a measurement of neighborhood disadvantage, using sociodemographic indicators from the Census.

The researchers found that more than 230 CVD events occurred during the eight-year timeframe. A correlation was found between CVD development and neighborhood factors such as less family income, less education, disadvantaged neighborhood settings, higher neighborhood violence, and worse risk factor profiles. Dr. Barber concludes that “poor neighborhood social conditions…do not occur in a vacuum and are a byproduct of the larger context of racial and economic stratification by place”. This work highlights the significance of place and how it interacts with health, encouraging further place-based initiatives.

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