Juliette K. Roddy

In Funded Scholars
roddy-j-1

Juliette K.

Roddy

PhD

Associate Professor 
University of Michigan, Dearborn

Professional Bio

Dr. Juliette Roddy is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, Dearborn. Her primary assignment is in the Masters of Public Policy program within the Social Sciences Department. Dr. Roddy’s area of research is substance abuse, specializing in the economic effects of opiate addiction. She has completed a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded three year postdoctoral position at Wayne State University’s Jefferson Avenue Research Clinic where methadone treatment is offered to Detroit area opiate users. Dr. Roddy was awarded the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s New Connections fellowship in July 2006. She is a member of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians and serves on the board of American Indian Health and Family Services, one of only 35 urban Native-American health clinics within the United States.

Project Description

Treatment for behavioral health lags behind the medical mainstream in terms of application and measurement of evidence-based practices (Lungren, 2005; Miller, Wilbourne and Hettema, 2003; Sorenson and Midkiff, 2002). This project aims to present a broad picture of consumer exposure to evidence-based substance abuse treatment, the intensity of the exposure, and the perceived quality experienced and described by the consumer. Using standards developed in literature for evidence-based care (Miller, 2005, NIDA 2000) the Fighting Back National data set (N = 3,297 national survey) and the National Survey of Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Problems data (Healthcare for Communities, HCC; N = 12,158) are examined for access and consumption of evidence based-practices of substance abuse services.

Findings

Correlations reveal significant relationships between types of insurance and treatment modes for substance abuse. In regression analysis, significant predictors of substance abuse treatment include public insurance plans (Medicare, Medicaid, gap/supplemental insurance and other public programs), while employer provided insurance is not a predictor. Residential treatment is significantly predicted by employer provided insurance. Cluster analysis reveals two groups of substance abuse treatment consumers clustered on six variables. Group 1 is enrolled in employer sponsored health insurance and is more likely to attend self-help substance abuse treatment. Group 2 is not enrolled in employer provided health insurance, incurs more months of substance abuse treatment, and is more likely to discuss substance abuse treatment with a primary care physician. Descriptive statistics on those who receive substance abuse/mental health care and had insurance (HCC, N = 1289) reveal that 74 (6 percent) consumed emergency room visits for substance abuse treatment, with 43 percent of those respondents visiting more than once. The analysis suggests insurance influences access and provision of treatment for substance abuse disorders. Evidence-based treatment standards and cost considerations will continue to impact treatment for behavioral health.

Why I Applied to New Connections

New Connections was a unique opportunity to participate in the support and mentoring activities that RWJF offers. The fellowship offered exposure to and networking with other minority researchers that would be difficult to develop without institutional assistance.

What New Connections Means for my Career

New Connections has provided valuable opportunities for networking and mentoring. The senior scientists that I have been given access to have had a very positive impact on my proposal and manuscript writing.

Research Interests

My research lies at the intersection of economics, substance abuse, substance abuse treatment and substance abuse recovery. I have considerable experience with drug courts.

Discipline(s)

Public Policy

Populations Served

Both the FB and the HCC surveys consist of nationally representative data obtained by phone interview. Mean age in the HCC survey is 49 (min = 18; max = 98), while mean age for the FB data is 31 (min = 16; max = 44).

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NIH R03 The Economics of Cigarette Smoking

NIH R21 An Economic and Ethnographic Investigation of Fresh Start (Detroit)

Duke DITE Fellow (2009).

The Details
  • New Connections Status: Junior Investigator
  • Award Year: 2006
  • RWJF Team/Portfolio: Vulnerable Populations 
  • Project Name: Access and Consumption of Addiction Treatment Service in Primary and Specialty Care Setting.
    Treatment for behavioral health lags behind the medical mainstream with respect of evidence-based practices. Using standards developed in literature for evidence-based care, Dr. Juliette Kathryn Roddy’s New Connections project aims to present a broad picture of consumer exposure to evidence-based substance abuse treatment, the intensity of the exposure, and the perceived quality experienced and described by the consumer.

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