Imelda K. Moise

In Funded Scholars
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Imelda K.

Moise

Assistant Professor
University of Miami, Florida

Professional Bio

Dr. Moise is an applied health geographer and monitoring & evaluation (M&E) specialist. Much of her work has primarily focused on utilizing mixed-method approaches and evidence-informed interventions that are culturally responsive to specific problems and contexts. Areas of focus include the socio-spatial diffusion and distribution of diseases, health care/utilization, geographical targeting, food environments, maternal, adolescent and child health. She is particularly interested in linking research to practice or policy on health disparities. Dr. Moise’s recent projects include a survey of the capacity of local mosquito control and taxing districts to prevent major and emerging mosquito-borne diseases in Florida, examination of substance abuse, and assessing at-risk drinking, sleep related and mental health issues during pregnancy among antenatal attendees.

She recently received a prestigious one-year American Evaluation Association Fellowship in 2017 focusing on culturally responsive evaluation theory and practice. She is also the recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)’s New Connections award, a career development program for early faculty researchers. Committed to geographic and public health research, teaching, and practice, and how they inform one another, Dr. Moise also engages in scholarship on teaching and learning research to determine how to best prepare the next generation of geographers and public health professionals.

Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Miami, Dr. Moise was a GIS /Global Health M&E Advisor in John Snow Inc. (JSI)’s International Division in Washington D.C., where she supported USAID funded health programs in low-middle income countries on various projects. Dr. Moise also spent five years as a Research Program Specialist in Illinois coordinating federally funded research projects and program evaluation for state agency initiatives and ongoing programs. She also spent six years as a Peace Corps technical trainer in Zambia. Dr. Moise currently serves as an academic editor on PLOS ONE Editorial Board.

Project Description

Much of Dr. Moise’s work has primarily focused on utilizing mixed-method approaches and evidence-informed interventions that are culturally responsive to specific problems and contexts. Areas of focus include the socio-spatial diffusion and distribution of diseases, health care/utilization, geographical targeting, food environments, maternal, adolescent & child health.

Why did you apply to New Connections

I applied for the New Connections grant because I wanted to expand my research focus to take a closer look at the effects of individual, neighborhood, and policy influences on risks of substance use. I wanted to go beyond broader understanding of my research topic to strengthen my knowledge of the underlying theory, causes, contexts, and methods, as well as to become a more effective academic. My goal is to use the New Connections Program’s network and the annual research and coaching clinic to develop and grow my research agenda, particularly my focus on health disparities, substance use/abuse, adolescent health issues, and links to policy and practice.

Research Interests

Mixed methods, culturally responsive research and evaluation, geographical targeting, healthcare/utilization, community-based participatory research, maternal & child health in Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeastern United States and Illinois.

Publications

Muturi EJ., Donthu RK, Fields CJ, Moise IK and Kim Chang-Hyun. (2017). “Effect of pesticides on microbial communities in container aquatic habitats.” Scientific Reports; 7(44565); DOI: 10.1038/srep44565.

Moise IK., Verity JF and Kangmennaang J. (2017). “Identifying youth-friendly service practices associated with adolescents’ use of reproductive healthcare services in post-conflict Burundi: a cross-sectional study.” International Journal of Health Geographics; 16(2); DOI: 10.1186/s12942-016-0075-3.

Moise IK and Ruiz OM. (2016). “Hospitalizations for substance abuse disorders before and after Hurricane Katrina: Spatial clustering and area level predictors, New Orleans, 2004 and 2008.” Preventing Chronic Disease 13 (E): DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5888/pcd13.160107.

Moise IK., Kalipeni E., Jusrut P., and Iwelunmor JI. (2016). “Assessing the reduction of infant mortality rates in Malawi over the 1990-2010 decades.”  Global Public Health; DOI 10.1080/17441692.2016.1239268.

Moise IK and Mulhall PF. (2016). “Providers’ perspectives on case management of a Healthy Start Program: A qualitative study.” PLOS ONE 11(5): e0154668. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154668.

Moise IK., et al. (2016). “Evaluation of geospatial methods to generate subnational HIV prevalence estimates for local level planning.” (The Subnational Estimates Working Group of the HIV Modelling Consortium, including Moise IK).  AIDS 30(9):1467–1474.  Full author listing is accessible at:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4867979/pdf/aids-30-1467.pdf.

Moise IK., Roy SS., Nkengurutse D and Ndikubagenzi J. (2016). “Seasonal and geographic variation of pediatric Malaria in Burundi: 2011 to 2012.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health: 13(4): 425; DOI: 10.3390/ijerph13040425.

Moise IK., Green DL. Toth J. and Mulhall PF. (2014). “Evaluation of an authority innovation-decision: Brief alcohol intervention for pregnant women receiving women, infants, and children services at two Illinois health departments.” Journal of Substance Abuse and Misuse, 49(7):804-812.

Grigsby-Toussaint DS and Moise IK. (2013). “Neighborhood deprivation and availability of culturally specific African-American and Latino fruits and vegetables in five small central Illinois cities.” Open Journal of Preventive Medicine, 3(2): DOI: 10.4236/ojpm.2013.32028.

The Details
  • New Connections Status: Junior Investigator
  • Award Year: 2018
  • RWJF Team/Portfolio: Creating Healthier, More Equitable Communities
  • Project Name: Examining age, racial/ethnic, and gender differences in alcohol-related hospitalizations of young people and the impact of liquor-related ordinances

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